Should the rights of our cats to roam be ended?

Do you think cats should be kept indoors?


  • Total voters
    11

SirMeow

Administrator
Staff member
Nov 25, 2021
448
504
Now, this one isn't controversial at all, no.

Personally, I'm fully in favour of keeping the little darlings indoors as it protects their welbeing and that of the local wildlife, but I especially care about my cat's welfare. There's no getting run over, catnapped, poisoned, or a million other awful calamities that can befall our beloved cutenesses, causing them and their loving owners such misery.

Most cats end up being perfectly happy locked in all their lives and watching cat TV out of the window. If possible, a catio* can be bult for them allowing them to enjoy the excitement and stimulation of the outdoors with none of the risks. It's important to ensure that an indoor cat gets the proper stimulation however, with toys, playing with them every day, scratching posts (no, not the sofa) etc. It's interesting that even cat experts are divided on this question.

Pet cats kill songbirds by the million, as well as rodents and other wildlife. But how much of a threat do they really pose, and should they be kept indoors? Expert opinion is divided

Please let us know what you think and vote in the poll.

Note: no anti-cat posts here. If you don't like them, then Feline Forums isn't for you.

leaping cats.jpg

Randomly leaping cats. You can blame the article for this.



*Check out this article if you don't know what a catio is.


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Mars

Active member
Aug 18, 2022
31
47
Yes, I agree that pet cats should be kept indoors, for the following main reasons:

1-For their own protection. So they don't get run over by a car.

2-For their own protection. So they don't fall into the hands of cruel people.....

3-For their own protection. Should they get injured outside and unable to get home, they might end up dying from lack of veterinary help.

4-To protect the birdies-Yes!!


The attitudes of both the RSPB and Cat Protection is puzzling. You would expect the RSPB to come out strong in favour of protecting the birds. All birds! Not just the endangered species.

I mean, when a 'common' little birdie falls prey to a cat, it suffers no less, it bleeds just as much, as an endangered one. Can't the RSPB see that?


And Cat Protection? They seem to endorse free roaming cats under the excuse of 'cats welfare'; like, let not the poor kitties suffer because they are being confined indoors.


The kitties will not suffer if their owners care and look after them. An indoor moggie who is well fed, given its space without being unduly pestered, and having comfy spots to lie down, is a happy feline.

Obviously this is just a summary. There is of course much more to keeping your feline happy and sane, then just supplying it with food and a bed. But letting your feline out and into danger - "for their own welfare" - is not an option.

So yes, I am certainly in favour of keeping our pet cats indoors. For their own sake, and for the safety of the birdies.
 

SirMeow

Administrator
Staff member
Nov 25, 2021
448
504
@Mars Welcome to FF! :)

All great points you make there. So far, we've got 3/3 for keeping our cutenesses indoors. (y)

I think point 2 is the strongest reason for me, because it's the intention to harm that's so revolting and unacceptable.

I mean, when a 'common' little birdie falls prey to a cat, it suffers no less, it bleeds just as much, as an endangered one. Can't the RSPB see that?
And yeah, hardly anyone, including animal charities seem to get this point. Unbelievable.

There is of course much more to keeping your feline happy and sane
Well, yes, obviously. Being its loyal slave at its beck and call, subject to your Master's every whim at all hours (especially the most awkward middle of the night ones when you're fast asleep) is but a minimum requirement.
 

thugtomas

New member
Sep 19, 2022
10
22
Access to the great outdoors is considered good for cats' wellbeing, a position shared by charities such as Cats Protection and Battersea Dogs
 

SirMeow

Administrator
Staff member
Nov 25, 2021
448
504
The evidence shows otherwise. This is why a catio should be used where possible, so that they can enjoy the outdoors in safety... and the outdoors can be safe from them!
 

KittyJ

Moderator
Staff member
Apr 27, 2021
455
641
The evidence shows otherwise. This is why a catio should be used where possible, so that they can enjoy the outdoors in safety... and the outdoors can be safe from them!
I completely agree.
Access to the great outdoors is considered good for cats' wellbeing, a position shared by charities such as Cats Protection and Battersea Dogs
It is true that the outdoors can be beneficial to cats, but the cons far outweigh the pros.
 

BernardOh

New member
Feb 8, 2023
9
17
Cats should be lock indoors.

Since they are smarter than humans, they will take over the world and rule over humans one day.

Locking them indoors, will prevent this from happening, if not at least slow down the process.

On the serious side, I personally advocate keeping them indoors, more for their personal safety and well being.
 

Mars

Active member
Aug 18, 2022
31
47
Cats should be lock indoors.

Since they are smarter than humans, they will take over the world and rule over humans one day.

Locking them indoors, will prevent this from happening, if not at least slow down the process.

On the serious side, I personally advocate keeping them indoors, more for their personal safety and well being.
I totally agree with keeping them indoors for their own safety.
This may not be easy if you adopt a rescue.
Some rescues have lived outdoors all their lives, until they met with an accident or some other misfortune, which have led to them being taken off the streets. Those cats are difficult to keep indoors, because they may develop unwanted behaviors, due to their frustration.

But, and there is a 'but' here: unless they are totally feral, (few cats are actually totally feral), they can be habituated to an indoor life, albeit this may take time and effort.
Exactly how to do it, would depend on the home environment, and the time the cat parent is able to dedicate to the task.
Broadly speaking:
1- getting the cat habituated to a harness, would allow it to be taken out on a lead.
2-Watch kitty, whenever she gets into a tizzy because she wants out...use distraction.
Distraction may consist of offering her a toy to kill. Most cats love it, and will immediately start stalking, catching and eviscerating their victim; but again, I know some are indifferent to it. How frustrating for us!!:confused:
3-If she lets you pick her up, then pick her up and talk to her.

I know all these suggestions may not work at all with a cat determined to escape its confinement. It would need a one-to-one training program.
It really depends on kitty's past experience, temperament, and even its sex.
One thing is for sure: letting her out puts her life at risk.
It is therefore a big 'no no' in my book. Kitty being a rescue or not...'in' she stays. Case closed.

Not so good for the wellbeing of native fauna however, or the cat if a python is about.
Precisely!
Access to the great outdoors is considered good for cats' wellbeing, a position shared by charities such as Cats Protection and Battersea Dogs
Yes, all those charities will tell you 'let your cat out', with caution....how absurd!
They say put a collar on her, attach a bell, so the birdies will hear her coming...I doubt that bell is gonna stop a car from running her over ??
It is beyond me how cat charities, that on a daily basis see the horrific injuries cats come in with, are still advising letting them out again!
 

Gizmoandsooz

Member
May 1, 2023
59
67
Gizmo used to be a feral cat. Until we trapped him. Had to get him neutured the next day. He's been an inside kitty ever since.
there is a cat that roams all the time as her owner doesn't keep her indoors.
Found out she got mauled to death by a dog.
moral of the story do not let your cats roam.
IMG_1449.jpeg
 

SirMeow

Administrator
Staff member
Nov 25, 2021
448
504
Very well said. Such an enormous number of hazards out there, it's madness to let them out.

And of course, it keeps the local wildlife safe from our cuddly friends, too.
 

Gizmoandsooz

Member
May 1, 2023
59
67
I'm pretty passionate about keeping your cat inside.
We used to let our cats roam but since my first cat who was a ginger and white cat got hit with a pitchfork by the next door neighbour who we found out hated cats and was terrified of dogs did to our cat.
I always let my brother's purr machine inside and kept her inside. Only my parents would put her out.
 

Buzad

New member
Jan 6, 2024
2
1
The question of whether the rights of our cats to roam should be ended is subjective and involves various perspectives. Advocates for restricting cat roaming often cite concerns about the impact on local wildlife, potential conflicts with other animals, and risks such as traffic accidents. On the other hand, those supporting the freedom of cat roaming argue that it is a natural behavior for felines and contributes to their overall well-being.

Ultimately, the decision to limit the rights of cats to roam depends on a careful consideration of the potential consequences and a balance between the welfare of the cats and the impact on the environment. It may involve implementing measures such as supervised outdoor time, enclosure systems, or community guidelines to address both the needs of cats and the concerns of their human companions and the broader community.